Issue 232
January/February 2023

‘I need to look at my work. I need to bond with it, like it’s my child.’ – Henry Taylor

In the January/February issue of frieze, Terence Trouillot profiles artist Henry Taylor ahead of shows at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Plus, one year after Russia declared war, four Ukrainians respond to the crisis in a dossier, including: a personal essay by painter and writer Kateryna Aliinyk; Adam Mazur profiles Taras Gembik, an artist and performer organizing picnics to raise money for Ukraine in Warsaw, Poland; Nikita Kadan on what art can mean in a time of war; editor-in-chief Andrew Durbin interviews Olha Honchar, the director of Territory of Terror Museum, which documents war crimes, and the coordinator for the Museum Crisis Center, an organization helping Ukrainian museums rescue their holdings from occupied zones.

Profile: Henry Taylor

‘I became the observer because I was trying to understand my own life and that’s why I started making pictures. I just like looking at people.’ Terence Trouillot considers how Henry Taylor’s oeuvre goes far beyond the canvas.

Dossier: Forms of Resistance

‘Since the rockets did not fly at us immediately, we started to help.’ In this dossier, we profile, interview and collect first-hand accounts from four Ukrainians, working within and without the country, who are striving to preserve their culture – and their lives.

Also featuring  

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe vs Wade, which protected universal abortion access, Megan Nolan examines female rage and abortion rights in film and literature; Tausif Noor speaks to photographer Sunil Gupta ahead of a forthcoming catalogue; in ‘1,500 Words’, Justin Beal reflects on the late Mike Davis’s Ecology of Fear (1998) and the author’s penchant for turning information into stories.

Columns: Adolescence

McKenzie Wark reconnects with dance in her ‘second adolescence’ after her transition; Ian Bourland writes about filmmaker Sky Hopinka and powwow youth survival; Justine Kurland explores the ethics of photographing children; Ilana Kaplan profiles The Linda Lindas, an LA-based, all-girl, teenage punk band tackling the heteropatriarchy one song at a time. Plus, five artists – Kelly Akashi, Gina Fischli, Sung Hwan Kim, Jordan Strafer and Atiéna R. Kilfa – recall formative interactions with works of art.

Plus, Lynne Tillman responds to a single work by Diane Arbus. Finally, Going Up, Going Down charts what’s hot and what’s not in the global art world and the latest iteration of our Lonely Arts column.

From this issue

On the 50th anniversary of the Roe v Wade ruling, Megan Nolan analyses how women's anger has been fetishized in film and literature

BY Megan Nolan | 02 FEB 23

McKenzie Wark shares how techno made her feel at home in her body

BY McKenzie Wark | 31 JAN 23

On the occasion of the centennial of the artist’s birth, Lynne Tillman offers a close reading of a lesser known photograph

BY Lynne Tillman | 27 JAN 23

The artist speaks about his archive, homosexuality, migration and the power of activism in India

BY Sunil Gupta AND Tausif Noor | 24 JAN 23

The artist and photographer confronts the ethical considerations made when photographing teenagers, and how they turn the camera onto themselves

BY Justine Kurland | 20 JAN 23

Twenty-five years since its publication, the correlations between power, wealth and ecology depicted in Davis's book remain utterly relevant

BY Justin Beal | 17 JAN 23

The artist’s new film, Powwow People, recreates the Indigenous dance gatherings that play a role in Native community formation

BY Ian Bourland | 17 JAN 23

Kelly Akashi, Gina Fischli, Atiéna R. Kilfa, Sung Hwan Kim and Jordan Strafer tell us about early important encounters with art

Terence Trouillot profiles the maverick painter, reflecting on how the artist’s work is intertwined with his community and personal histories

BY Terence Trouillot | 05 JAN 23

The director of Ukraine’s Museums Crisis Centre discusses her work to preserve her country’s cultural heritage

BY Andrew Durbin AND Olha Honchar | 04 JAN 23

A profile of the teenage band that went from viral sensation to international rock stars

BY Ilana Kaplan | 04 JAN 23

Nikita Kadan reflects on what it has meant to exhibit in the EU since the Russian invasion

BY Nikita Kadan | 04 JAN 23

Taras Gembik draws attention to the plight of migrants in Warsaw

BY Adam Mazur | 04 JAN 23

After fleeing the city in 2014, Kateryna Aliinyk remembers the landscape of her childhood

BY Kateryna Aliinyk | 04 JAN 23

At Museum der Moderne Salzburg, the artist rebels against the limits of traditional media

BY Francesca Gavin | 24 NOV 22

'Queering Photography’ at C/O Berlin and ‘Queering the Crip, Cripping the Queer’ at Schwules Museum explore representations of identity, gender, disability and sexuality

BY Kevin Brazil | 18 NOV 22

At Kunsthalle Münster, the artist canonizes contemporary history in his riotous first institutional solo exhibition outside of Poland

BY Krzysztof Kościuczuk | 18 NOV 22

At a retrospective at Museo de Arte Miguel Urrutia, Bogotá, 40 years of the collective’s work demonstrates their trans-disciplinary explorations of Colombian histories of violence and displacement

BY Jennifer Burris | 15 NOV 22

‘STAND’, at The Watermill Center, New York, is the most comprehensive survey to date at the institution that jumpstarted the artist’s 50-year career

BY Rebecca Rose Cuomo | 09 NOV 22

The artists’ installations of components retired from the whisky-distillation process explore sound, labour and materiality

BY Neil Price | 08 NOV 22

At Astrup Fearnley Museet, the American visual artist interrogates private and performative spaces of engagement

BY Alice Godwin | 03 NOV 22

At Thomas Dane, Naples, a group exhibition looks to the found object for inspiration

BY Allie Biswas | 02 NOV 22

A set of interrelated conceptual, text- and body-based sculptures and video works at Today Art Museum, Beijing, allows the artist to meditate on individual freedom and geopolitical tensions

BY Nooshfar Afnan | 01 NOV 22

At Monique Meloche, Chicago, the artist subverts the worst of American racial stereotyping in briskly emotive figurative paintings

BY Jackson Arn | 27 OCT 22

In two interrelated solo exhibitions at Silverlens, New York, Atienza refuses a touristic gaze of the Philippines’s landscape while Yee urges grassroots governance

 

BY Danielle Wu | 26 OCT 22

At Haus am Waldsee, Berlin, the artist's site-specific installation investigates the ‘incurable experience’ of being female

BY Isabel Parkes | 26 OCT 22

At Newport Street Gallery, London, the artist performatively burnt thousands of his own works 

BY Tom Morton | 24 OCT 22

At Museu de Arte de São Paulo, the artist memorializes the Black leaders and notable individuals overlooked in the country’s visual past

BY Camila Belchior | 20 OCT 22

At Hepworth Wakefield, the artist’s light-sensitive paintings are an ongoing work in progress

BY Lauren Dei | 20 OCT 22

At Hauser & Wirth, Zürich, a survey of the artist’s work from the past 30 years likens painting to shooting practice

BY Camila McHugh | 19 OCT 22

An enthralling retrospective at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, gathers 40 years worth of works in a diverse range of mediums

BY Tim Smith-Laing | 19 OCT 22

Both regional and international artists probe the history and identity of the port city, offering a template for other biennials to stave away hyper-globalist perspectives

BY Park Jaeyong | 19 OCT 22

At Graves Gallery, Sheffield, the artist positions the home as a critical site of cultural preservation and exchange

BY Cathy Wade | 18 OCT 22

At Alma Sarif, Brussels, the artist quietly presents 56 litres of paint

BY Emile Rubino | 07 OCT 22

'52 Artists: A Feminist Milestone' at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum commemorates and expands upon Lucy Lippard's groundbreaking 1971 exhibition 'Twenty Six Contemporary Women Artists'

BY Erica N. Cardwell | 06 OCT 22

In her solo exhibition at MARCH, New York, the artist depicts communal life in scenes of both peace and violence as a site for political revolution

BY Madeleine Seidel | 27 SEP 22

At Maureen Paley, the artist uses the archive to reckon with women’s history in the UK

BY Hettie Judah | 26 SEP 22

At FRAC, Marseille, the artist probes the hidden colonial legacies of the Algerian War

BY Wilson Tarbox | 20 SEP 22