Sprüth Magers

Showing results 1-17 of 17

Kilimnik’s subjects are nearly always brutal – murder, empire, war – and just as often delivered with a practiced detachment

BY Travis Diehl | 18 OCT 19

A guide to the best shows around town

BY Rianna Jade Parker | 01 OCT 19

For her exhibition at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, the artist explores the potential of indefinite loops

BY Grace Sparapani | 09 JAN 19

The artist’s sculpture possessed an almost surreal promise, as if at any moment it might become a Really Living Thing

BY Andrew Durbin | 04 DEC 18

The Berlin-based gallery wins for an outstanding gallery presentation at Frieze London

03 OCT 18

With exhibitions at more than 45 official participating venues, here’s our guide of what not to miss during Berlin Art Week

BY Emily McDermott | 26 SEP 18

‘When I opened Monika Sprüth Galerie, only very few German gallerists represented women artists’

BY Pablo Larios | 09 JUL 18

From a preview of Konrad Fischer’s new space, to Simon Fujiwara’s thought-provoking commentary on gender bias

BY Hili Perlson | 24 APR 18

All three galleries of Sprüth Magers’s Berlin space are given over to the late artist’s painterly evolution, much of which is long unseen

BY John Quin | 04 APR 18
Article

A rising gallery scene in a city challenging stereotypes

BY Bettina Korek | 18 APR 16

Q. If you could live with only one piece of art what would it be? A. Las Meninas (1656), my first art-love. 

BY David Lamelas | 26 FEB 16

Wayne Thiebaud in conversation with Thomas Demand

BY Thomas Demand | 10 OCT 14

Sprüth Magers, Berlin, Germany

BY Kirsty Bell | 13 AUG 14

A mini retrospective at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, shows the artist was never the cut-and-dried Minimalist of legend

BY Mark Prince | 01 MAY 12

Sammlung Falckenberg, Hamburg and Sprüth Magers, Berlin, Germany

BY Jörg Heiser | 01 OCT 10

Grappling with the work of an artist who relishes multiple viewpoints, myriad materials and a slippery approach to meaning

BY Julian Myers | 04 APR 09

Despite their contributions, female gallerists have historically been under-recognised. A new book seeks to make amends

BY Martin Herbert | 12 MAR 09